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The Curator: Startup Downers, Entrepreneurship Lies, Angel Funding, Communication Barriers, SEC Ruling

Here’s our weekly link roundup of small business buzz, musings and muchness. A curation of the best small business talk around the web.


Here’s our weekly link roundup of small business buzz, musings and muchness. A curation of the best small business talk around the web.

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Startups Can’t Survive With ‘Downers’ on the Team

A “downer” is defined here as someone who seems to dwell on the negatives of every business challenge, and loves to highlight bad news or potential problems. No matter how smart or experienced this person may otherwise be, things must change or they will kill your startup. (Business Insider)

Six Whopping Lies Told About Entrepreneurs

As more people aspire to become entrepreneurs, it is important to dispel many of the misperceptions about this species. Here are six big ones that even some entrepreneurs believe…” (Forbes)

Why don’t good ideas get funded? Here’s the answer…

Many good ideas don’t get funded. We all accept that. And many bad ideas do get funded. That is harder to accept, but accept it we must. So, what is it that determines whether an idea gets funded or not? Is it just the quality of the idea? Clearly not… It begins, I believe, with the quality of the leadership and the leadership team. (iBusinessAngel)

Entrepreneurs Face Serious Communication Barriers

Most startup mentors tell me that the single biggest problem they have to deal with in small companies is the lack of open, honest, and effective communication, both from the top down and from the bottom up. Some entrepreneurs forget that talking is not communicating. Fortunately these skills can be learned, and the barriers to communication can be overcome one by one. (Forbes)

Will Letting VCs Advertise Mean More ‘Small Checks’ For Startups?

Yesterday the Securities and Exchange Commission voted 4-1 to lift restrictions on how hedge funds, venture capital firms, and other privately held companies can promote themselves to potential investors. While these firms will soon be able to broadcast their offerings, they can’t take money from just anybody: Investors must be accredited, which means the SEC considers them wealthy enough to risk their money. Critics say the change still opens the door to fraud. (Bloomberg Businessweek)

 

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