5 Easy Ways To Increase Facebook Group Engagement

Here are 5 ways to increase engagement in your Facebook group starting right now.

Photo: Jordana Jaffe, Owner of Embarkability, Women's Business Mentor; Source: Courtesy Photo
Photo: Jordana Jaffe, Owner of Embarkability, Women’s Business Mentor; Source: Courtesy Photo

There’s no denying it – Facebook groups are on the rise. Facebook Groups are an amazing way to gather your community, position yourself as an expert, and inspire your tribe to ultimately become raving fans and paying clients.

So, if you’re an introvert, a homebody, a stay at home parent or you just love hanging out on Facebook, having your own group is a great way to grow your business.

One of the biggest questions I consistently receive is about Facebook Group engagement. How do I get the people in my group to become more engaged? How do I get them to stay engaged? How do I create a space where their engagement isn’t completely dependent upon me?

The great news is that the way to do this is easy and simple. Here are 5 ways to increase social engagement in your Facebook group starting right now:

 

  1. Ask where they live.

    The reason this question works so well is because it’s a simple question that requires a simple answer. People aren’t required to spend any time thinking about their answer and there’s no vulnerability involved either. Another fun thing about this question is that the people in your community get to find out where everyone lives. When I’ve done this in my own group, people have connected with each other locally. For example, one time, someone realized that they lived down the road from someone else.

  2. Ask what they do in under 5 words.

    The reason this question works so well is because, again, it’s a simple question. It requires a simple answer and people love to talk about themselves. Limiting their answer to 5 words is the key because otherwise, people will get stuck and overthink what they should say. This is also an amazing opportunity for the people in your community to connect with each other and explore potential collaborations. It’s easy to skim through what everyone does when people sum up what they do in 5 words or less.

  3. Go first.

    Too often someone who has their own Facebook group comes to me, feeling completely defeated because they posted something they thought was amazing, and no one responded. They feel confused, ignored, and embarrassed. After speaking with them for a bit, I quickly identify the problem. They didn’t go first. What I mean by this is that they asked their community a question, but they didn’t answer the question themselves. The leader must lead. And oftentimes, when you ask a question that invites people to be vulnerable, the likelihood of them responding is much lower if you don’t share your vulnerabilities first.

  4. Ask for feedback.

    People love to feel like their opinions are valuable. So, if you want to know what would make people in your group more engaged, ask them! You can ask them what they want to see more of, their favorite thing about your group, or how they want to feel in your group. Then, really listen to what they’re telling you. Do whatever you can to deliver, as long as it feels good to you too.

  5. Ask fun questions.

    Ask them what they favorite childhood book is or their favorite amusement park ride. Invite them to tap into the part of their lives that excites them and lights them up. People love answering questions that bring them back to sweet memories and fun moments in their lives.

 

This article has been edited and condensed.

Jordana Jaffe teaches women entrepreneurs who are introverts or homebodies how to create their own super engaged Facebook group and effectively participate in other people’s groups. Jaffe counsels clients on how they can grow their online community and get clients while staying at home in their cozy PJs. Learn how she created her own super engaged Facebook group filled with thousands of her ideal clients – and how you can too—here. Connect with @jordanajaffe on Twitter.

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