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Fine Art Photographer Finds Inspiration in the Ordinary

Great photography [and art] speaks for itself. Although Alex Remington has been shooting pictures for over a decade, in recent years he debuted as a professional photographer. Many...

Great photography [and art] speaks for itself. Although Alex Remington has been shooting pictures for over a decade, in recent years he debuted as a professional photographer. Many aspiring photographers and artists vie for an opportunity to turn their passion into a sustainable and profitable business. Alex Remington is a stylish and classic example of ‘passion meets purpose’ and how to develop your creative aspirations into a successful and award-winning company.

Remington began Alex Remington Fine Art Photography in 2006 to satisfy the demands of friends to purchase his pieces and has been showing pieces at fine art shows in the local Dallas market ever since. Remington’s images have a surreal quality and he tends to find inspiration within the ordinary. However, nothing is ordinary about Remington’s success. In 2009 he was named Dallas’ Best New Artist by the Dallas Observer in Dallas, TX.

Company: Alex Remington Fine Art Photography

Founder, Age: Alex Remington, 38

Location: Dallas, Texas

Start-Up Year: 2006

Start-Up Costs: $30,000

How I Got Started: I have been a photographer for 11 years, but only started selling my work due to some local demand four years ago.

Best Success Story: Without [knowing that I had even been nominated], I won Best New Artist in 2008 in the Dallas Observer.

Biggest Start-Up Challenge: Deciding how to spend my time. I design [and maintain] my website, create pieces for fine art shows, host clients at my studio, maintain a Social Media presence, print my own business cards, handle framing, do all my own printing, create brochures, and the list goes on. Deciding what to do first and how much time I should spend on a task is my most difficult challenge.

#1 Tips for Newbies: Hone your craft first. Become the best artist you can be. Then, when you know there is a demand for your work – create a marketing plan. Break the marketing plan down into weekly and monthly goals so that you focus on the most important things first. Art is half business and half creation – most artists don’t spend enough time on the promotion and business side of things.

 

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