How to Cultivate More Workplace Creativity

There are plenty of roadblocks your team will have to overcome to breakthrough in your industry; your company culture shouldn’t be one of them.

Today’s startup scene is an overcrowded space where companies are constantly vying for talent. But hiring talented people is only the first step in cultivating an innovative and creative environment. Building a workplace that embraces a constant exchange of ideas involves developing the right company culture.

You can’t force creativity, but the right setting can put your team in the best frame of mind to find imaginative solutions. Here are six ways to cultivate more creativity in your company:

 

1. Be easygoing.

A relaxed and flexible workplace can increase your team’s productivity. Start by encourage an atmosphere where the boss is more likely to make an employee a cup of coffee rather than always expecting the opposite. Let go of the traditional 9-5 work week and give team members the option to work when they are rested. Not everyone is an early bird, and that’s good! Embrace your employees’ natural rhythm and they’ll show up to work fresh and ready to go.

 

2. Hire for culture.

Look for team members who understand your vision and fit with your company culture. Developing a team that shares one vision and works together helps the organization run smoothly. This doesn’t mean you should only hire people who always agree with you, though. Encourage different perspectives and it will help your company stay ahead of the curve.

 

3. Hire passionate people.

Hire employees that are passionate about their work. You want to employ people who really care; people who are excited to go to work everyday because they believe in the vision. Hiring people that want to improve your business will be the most beneficial, long-term. Most importantly, it is far more pleasant to work alongside interesting, friendly, and driven people working towards common goals.

 

4. Encourage diversity.

Form a team with different backgrounds, passions, and capabilities. Creating a group with a diverse set of ideas and problem-solving approaches can push your business forward. Embrace and celebrate your team members’ individuality.

 

5. Incorporate sprints.

The hustle and bustle of daily office life can wreak havoc on concentration: emails, phones, meetings — the distractions can be endless. That’s where a “sprint,” a set amount of time in which your team works to finish a project, can be the solution.

Startups develop quickly in the early stages because everyday interruptions are minimum. When your company starts to grow into individual teams, having them work in a remote location surrounded by nature is a great way to center your focus and finalize a project from start to finish.

 

6. Take ample time off.

Take a vacation — or two. Our brains are constantly on and connected so, taking time off for rest and relaxation is crucial for a healthy work-life balance. Workaholics don’t produce the highest quality work, and you want employees to be fresh and excited to be a part of the team. Convey to your employees the importance of time-off — and make it non-negotiable.

 

There are plenty of roadblocks your team will have to overcome to breakthrough in your industry; your company culture shouldn’t be one of them. Reimagine what “work” should look like, and you’ll be surprised at the impact it will have on your team’s energy and creativity.

 

Christian Springub started his first business at the age of 12 buying and reselling kinder suprise collectible toys at flea markets. Three years later he switched to creating websites for small business in his hometown with Fridtjof. Christian moved to San Francisco in 2011 to build Jimdo in the USA.

 

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