Are You Truly Easing (And Solving) Your Customers’ Pain?

You work hard to acquire customers, so of course you want to build lasting relationships and keep them coming back.

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You work hard to acquire customers, so of course you want to build lasting relationships and keep them coming back.

You gain a customer because they are in some sort of “pain” and you have something to relieve their pain. However, keeping that customer isn’t just merely about understanding their pain. It’s also about how you respond and prevent it in the future.

One thing customers don’t want: More pain.

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“You gain a customer because they are in some sort of “pain” and you have something to relieve their pain. However, keeping that customer isn’t just merely about understanding their pain. It’s also about how you respond and prevent it in the future.”

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Examples of things that cause customers more pain: a missed delivery, a broken promise, missing parts, or a defective product. Customers want a problem-free experience. That is why successful business owners build systems, automation, and infrastructure that anticipates problems, obstacles and solutions before bad things happen.

What customers want: A solution to their pain.

 

Understanding Customer Pain Points

Just like a very ill patient that goes to a doctor, customers come to you because they believe you can relieve their pain.

For example, let’s say you own a furniture store and a new customer walks through the door. She isn’t here because you offer free cookies and coffee. She walks in because she is in “pain”.

She owns an old, worn out dining room set. Her new in-laws are coming over for dinner next week. She thinks her old-shabby dining room set will be an embarrassment. This causes her “pain”. She walked into your furniture store to find relief (i.e., a new dining room set) to ease that pain.

 

Responding to a Customer’s Pain

Any rational consumer realizes at the end of the day we are all human and we make mistakes. However, the key factor that makes a customer furious or forgiving is your response.

A customer’s reaction is almost always a reflection of your response to a situation. If the customer gets the slightest inkling you don’t care (e.g., you’re slow to respond, you throw terms and conditions in the customer’s face, you remind them of “industry standards” etc.), they will become relentless in making you pay.

In contrast, if you demonstrate you accept responsibility and communicate you are doing everything possible to make things right (e.g., overnight shipping and product, replacement, repairing damage, having a senior manager call back, etc.), your customer will most likely keep doing business with you and tell her friends they should too.

 

Causing Customer’s Pain?

You may be thinking: what should I do if I cause a customer pain?

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