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Psychology Impacts Marketing In More Ways Than You Think

Here’s a look at some important psychological factors to keep in mind when crafting marketing and brand strategies.

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Simon Crompton, freelance Journalist and entrepreneur; Source: Courtesy Photo
Simon Crompton, freelance Journalist and entrepreneur; Source: Courtesy Photo

Creating a brand is an involved process. Although it is important to pay attention to things like demographics and sociological forces that apply to your target market, you have to get into the minds of your audience to be truly successful.

This is why customer psychology has been such an important tool for marketing professionals. As a new business, you are aiming to have a particular psychological effect on your audience — you are meeting their needs and understanding their actions, and must inspire people to use your product.

According to Psychology Today, each of us is subjected to anywhere between 3,000 and 10,000 brand exposures every day. What this means for you is you have a lot of competition, therefore it is important that your brand stands out among the masses.

Here’s a look at some important psychological factors to keep in mind when crafting marketing and brand strategies.

 

Color and Branding

In a study called the Impact of Color on Marketing, researchers found that up to 90 percent of snap judgments made about products can be based on color alone. Although color is an important factor, studies have shown color preference is more nuanced than previously thought.

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“In actuality, color preference is built on experience, and does not inherently own a set of emotions independent of our brains. We think yellow is happy because of our experience with it … We make the connection because it was made for us.”

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In actuality, color preference is built on experience, and does not inherently own a set of emotions independent of our brains. We think yellow is happy because of our experience with it: we see it on the smiley faces and bumper stickers everywhere. We make the connection because it was made for us.

“I might like purple more than you because my sister’s bedroom was purple and I had positive experiences there,” said Karen Schloss, a graduate student in psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, in a study on human color preference. “Your own personal preference is determined by all the entities you’ve encountered of that color and how much you liked them.”

We also make connections with color thanks to other successful branding techniques. A study called The Interactive Effects of Colors shows the relationship between brands and color is dependent upon the color’s usual perception (i.e., does the color “fit” the product).

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