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The Response To COVID-19 Should Be More Kindness

Researchers found that being kind to ourselves or to anyone else — yes, even a stranger — or actively observing kindness around us boosted happiness.


Photo: Ren Lenhof, Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based photographer and blogger | Courtesy Photo

I have noticed my friends and I now more than ever, participating in charity events, donating, and showing random acts of kindness during this pandemic. Random acts of kindness are exponentially taking place, they are necessary, now more than ever, and there are simple ways you can spread joy during these unprecedented times.

When we eventually come out on the other side of this pandemic, acts of kindness help you just as much as those on the receiving end.

 

Spread joy during uncertain times

Now is as good a time as any to reach out to those who may have had a brief, albeit powerful impact on the way we live our lives. Spreading joy and saying thank you is so important, especially as many of us shelter-in-place and limit social interactions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

During a time of uncertainty and isolation, reaching out to loved ones, family, friends, and acquaintances can mean more than you will ever know. When someone has an impact on your life, a simple ‘thank you’ can be extraordinary. This time can inspire you to reach out to others and let them know how they have been influential in your life and that they are not alone.

Spread some joy to make others smile and brighten their day with random acts of kindness.

Photo: Mish Vizesi, Pexels
Photo: Mish Vizesi, YFS Magazine

 

Random acts of kindness boost happiness

Being kind pays off. “Research shows that acts of kindness make us feel better and healthier.” Here’s a look at a few ideas to get started.

  • Send a friend a gift card for their favorite local coffee shop.
  • Send a “just because” card to thank them for being in your life and impacting who you are today.
  • Send fresh flowers to brighten their home.
  • Order their favorite snack, meal, or dessert for delivery to their door. If you live close by, drop it off on their porch. This is a win-win since you can get out of the house for some fresh air (safely) and surprise your loved one.
  • Pick up the phone and say hello. Phone calls seem to be a thing of the past. However, videoconferencing apps like FaceTime, Zoom, and voice calls have experienced a recent uptick in demand due to shelter in place orders and extended social distancing measures. We need interaction, so leverage technology to connect with those close to you.
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According to Harvard Health, a study reported “on how people felt after performing or observing kind acts every day for seven days. Participants were randomly assigned to carry out at least one more kind act than usual for someone close to them, an acquaintance or stranger, or themselves, or to try to actively observe kind acts. Happiness was measured before and after the seven days of kindness. The researchers found that being kind to ourselves or to anyone else — yes, even a stranger — or actively observing kindness around us boosted happiness.”

 

During a public health crisis, kindness is desperately needed all around the world. We are sheltering in place and have little to no contact with others around us. Performing random acts of kindness can help someone to see the good in the world. As you spread joy and happiness, you will help others experience the good during difficult times.

 

Ren Lenhof is a Milwaukee, Wisconsin-based photographer and blogger who has been featured on Martha Stewart, Huffington Post, West Elm, Pepsi, and more! Check out her lifestyle blog and photography at housefur.com.

 

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Photo: Anna Shvets, Pexels
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