fbpx

Effective Business Writing Tips for Entrepreneurs

When preparing to create business material, here are some significant elements to keep in mind as you draft the final product.

Prev1 of 2Next
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse


Photo: Kaylia Fontenot, freelance writer at The Savvy Scribe; Source: Courtesy Photo
Photo: Kaylia Fontenot, freelance writer at The Savvy Scribe; Source: Courtesy Photo

Every small business has writing needs. Whether it is a press release, sales proposal, marketing plan, a company blog post, or a white paper, most organizations have a constant need for content development.

Most business professionals can handle their writing needs and craft decent material. If not, they hire a copywriter or marketing professional. No matter which option you choose, it is important that the proposal or plan, effectively conveys the message and is a positive reflection on your business.

When preparing to create business material, here are some significant elements to keep in mind as you draft the final product.

 

Why is this being created?

Too often, organizations do things just because they feel it’s what they are “supposed” to be doing. There are companies who send out press releases for hiring new managers or when they acquire new land. And that is fine, maybe. Figure out what is truly important before creating content just to create content.

Sure, the new hire may have been a very important addition to the organization; however, unless it is a strategic hire to support an impending IPO maybe an email would have been more appropriate. Don’t waste time on fluff. Get to the point. If the message isn’t straightforward, the reader will stop reading and all of your hard work will be in vain.

 

Who is the target audience?

Potential investors? Employees? Customers? Figure out who the audience is before starting to write. I know that sometimes the message to investors and customers can be similar: essentially, your goal is to persuade both to invest in your organization. However, the press release that gives a detailed preview of last year’s financial statement is not relevant to potential customers. Also, the tone would be different. Usually, when dealing with customers, the tone can be more relaxed and conversational whereas when dealing with employees, take on a more professional tone.

 

Is jargon necessary?

When I first started working on my MBA, the entire first semester can be characterized as me saying (to myself, of course), “huh?” My background was literature and language. I was stepping into new territory so adapting to the language was necessary for my survival; this does not stand true for your customers.

There is no need for your customer to be frustrated by the unnecessary use of jargon and technical terms. If you can avoid using technical language, then do so. It all depends on the context, however. If a tech company wants to explain new technology, then jargon is appropriate. Create content that is easy to understand. Craft a message that can be conveyed in less complex terms.

Prev1 of 2Next
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse
 

© YFS Magazine. All Rights Reserved. Copying prohibited. All material is protected by U.S. and international copyright laws. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of this material is prohibited. Sharing of this material under Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International terms, listed here, is permitted.

   

In this article

Copy link
Powered by Social Snap